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TNA going to well too often with Hardys

(Courtesy of TNA)
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TNA has been doing relatively well as of late. We can acknowledge that while still being able to point out some of its iffy decisions. One of those being the complete and massive overuse of both Jeff and Matt Hardy.

Of course it is worth mentioning that The Final Deletion angle helped to put TNA back on the map to some degree, but it is also important to note that it doesn’t necessarily mean either of the Hardy brothers need to be jammed down our throat several times on a single show.

But that’s exactly what is happening. On the most recent episode, as a patently absurd example, at least one member of the Hardy family (which extends to Matt’s wife) was in a segment a total of four different times. Another way to put it, the Hardys were on Impact at a rate of nearly every other segment.

Part of this is understandable. Totally, even. Jeff and Matt are two of TNA’s more marketable stars, have name recognition, and a section of people really seem to enjoy the Broken Matt Hardy and Brother Nero angle the two are doing.

That being said, even if a thing is good, too much of it can become bad. Keep jamming whatever down our collective throats, and not only is the rarity — which keeps it special — washed away, but the over saturation can make people turn on something they would otherwise love.

An example being Tim Tebow. Here is a harmless fellow. An all-time great college quarterback, but a guy who was not really an NFL-caliber gunslinger. But people turned on him despite there being nothing inherently wrong with the guy. Why? Because the media covered him to the point of nausea. As an indirect result of being sick of the coverage, people would then turn on Tebow as if he did something wrong — which he really hasn’t.

Again, there is nothing wrong with their story. In fact, it has been mostly engaging. An aspect of TNA storytelling that has lacked since the company was founded. But as it is with all things TNA-related, it can’t simply allow a good thing to be, it has to milk every ounce of goodness out of it before it no longer remains entertaining.

To be fair, this complete blasting of Hardys on our television sets might be more out of need than want. Since the federation has so few full-timers, coupled with very few engaging talents, TNA might feel obligated to figuratively ride the horses that brought them to the dance — though, they haven’t actually arrived anywhere yet.

That being said, it is still less than ideal. It is an issue the company needs to address and something it needs to find alternatives for.

Because if TNA doesn’t, and we continue to see a Hardy on Impact at every turn, how long will it be before people get sick of it? The answer is not long. Considering TNA is a fringe product as is, it’s probably not a great idea to turn away the few customers they have.

And what if the Hardys left? That would be pretty wretched. Those months of programming that were dedicated to one specific family, then they leave for greener pastures? Talk about egg on one’s face.

Be careful, TNA. You have a good thing going. Don’t abuse it.

TNA going to well too often with Hardys

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